Over the next 40 years, the building was in continuous use until an economic decline during the 1960s and 1970s caused Eden Publishing to abruptly close its operations in 1978.  The building sat empty for several years and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1986 for its unique architecture and historic heritage.  Today, the grandeur of the Eden building is being preserved through an extensive conversion into unique residences known as Eden Lofts.  Experience turn-of-the century architecture and St. Louis history today in the Eden Lofts—perfectly situated, central living in Lafayette Square.

Content Credit: http://www.gilded-age.com/eden_history.html

History

The Eden Loft building was originally constructed to house the Eden Publishing House in 1896 and is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  A few weeks after opening, the Great Cyclone of 1896 damaged the building and contents, but was quickly repaired and remained relatively unchanged, save for a few additions, for three decades.  In 1929 architects Hoener, Baum and Froese were commissioned to design the current five-story Synod building in the Art Deco Style located immediately west of the original structure.  The modernist design of the addition was carried over to the original three-story building with a new brick and terra cotta facade.